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Packaging Digest

  1. 7 packaging designs that make the most of summer movie mania: Gallery

    As we enter the dog days of summer, kids and kidults alike try to cram as much fun into what time they have left to enjoy the season. Like taking in a cool movie when the temps heat up.

    Tapping into the marketing magic of blockbuster movies, brand owners have adorned their packages with heros, dinosaurs and cute yellow troublemakers. See some popular character studies in our entertaining slideshow.

     

    • Yoplait attracts Minion lovers—kids and parents alike—with graphics from the “Despicable Me: Minion Made” movie on low-fat yogurt cups and their multipack cartons. Who can resist those big eyes and impish smile?
    • Kraft keeps its eye on the yellow rush, too, putting Cyclops Minion Stuart on boxes of its popular Macaroni & Cheese. The macaroni takes the shapes of Minions, too. Personally, I would have changed the food dye to be yellow, too, rather than the typical orange. Right?
    • Kellogg’s proves that T-Rex still rules the world by putting the king-dino front and center on a box of assorted fruit flavored snacks. This “Jurassic World” star stays at the top of the food chain. What was the name of that other bad dinosaur in the movie? [Spoiler alert!] Once T-Rex shows up, short arms and all, he commands the screen—and the hearts of snackers of all ages.
    • After a bout of play fighting and saving the universe, kids (and kidults) can cool down with a three-flavored Popsicle being promoted by three heros from “Marvel Avengers: Age of Ultron.” Ironman, the Hulk and Captain America are on your side, as they leap from the box.
    • Nestle taps the “Cap” as the main man for its Nesquik limited-edition label on this single-serve Vanilla lowfat milk bottle. I can see clean-cut Captain America downing chilled milk. The Hulk, not so much.
    • Think packaging design movie tie-ins only work for kids’ products? Think again. White Coffee Corp. believes the Marvel  Avengers superheros are hot enough to sell coffee to adults. “Our consumers are huge Marvel fans,” says Jonathan White, the company’s evp. Not a coffee drinker? The packaging designers did a great job on the carton graphics for hot chocolate, too.
    • Bonus: And in the wings are light sabers and other “force”-ful images, as brands cue up their “Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens” promotions in anticipation of the movie’s December release in the U.S. These Fla-Vor-Ice tubes sorta look like... More Star Wars movie tie-ins later!
    • Yoplait attracts Minion lovers—kids and parents alike—with graphics from the “Despicable Me: Minion Made” movie on low-fat yogurt cups and their multipack cartons. Who can resist those big eyes and impish smile?
    • Kraft keeps its eye on the yellow rush, too, putting Cyclops Minion Stuart on boxes of its popular Macaroni & Cheese. The macaroni takes the shapes of Minions, too. Personally, I would have changed the food dye to be yellow, too, rather than the typical orange. Right?
    • Kellogg’s proves that T-Rex still rules the world by putting the king-dino front and center on a box of assorted fruit flavored snacks. This “Jurassic World” star stays at the top of the food chain. What was the name of that other bad dinosaur in the movie? [Spoiler alert!] Once T-Rex shows up, short arms and all, he commands the screen—and the hearts of snackers of all ages.
    • After a bout of play fighting and saving the universe, kids (and kidults) can cool down with a three-flavored Popsicle being promoted by three heros from “Marvel Avengers: Age of Ultron.” Ironman, the Hulk and Captain America are on your side, as they leap from the box.
    • Nestle taps the “Cap” as the main man for its Nesquik limited-edition label on this single-serve Vanilla lowfat milk bottle. I can see clean-cut Captain America downing chilled milk. The Hulk, not so much.
    • Think packaging design movie tie-ins only work for kids’ products? Think again. White Coffee Corp. believes the Marvel  Avengers superheros are hot enough to sell coffee to adults. “Our consumers are huge Marvel fans,” says Jonathan White, the company’s evp. Not a coffee drinker? The packaging designers did a great job on the carton graphics for hot chocolate, too.
    • Bonus: And in the wings are light sabers and other “force”-ful images, as brands cue up their “Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens” promotions in anticipation of the movie’s December release in the U.S. These Fla-Vor-Ice tubes sorta look like... More Star Wars movie tie-ins later!
  2. LabelsOnTime.com
    LabelsOntime.com is a manufacturer of Thermal Transfer Labels & Direct Thermal Labels on rolls or fanfold for Zebra, Epson, Intermec, Sato and many other printers. In stock ready to ship from 4 locations.

    Labelsontime.com is a thermal label division of label manufacturer Worldlabel Holdings Inc., a label company that has been delivering labels to satisfied customers since 1998, and is one of the largest online label stores for PrintPeelApply™ brand laser and inkjet printer labels, serving labels in over 100 sizes and 30 different materials.

    We are a large volume producer of thermal transfer and direct thermal labels, and provide labels in popular sizes for Zebra, Intermec, Printronix, Dymo, and Sato printers, among others online. We also have the capabilitiy for both short and long run manufacturing of custom thermal labels in many different thermal printable materials and adhesives. We can stock these sizes for your company in our 4 nationwide warehouses for on time deliveries.

    Our customers range from Global 100 companies to small mom and pop shops, and we provide samples to test, and superior customer service. We make it as easy for you to buy roll thermal labels online and have a pleasant buying experience.

    Labelsontime.com is a flexible company, we tailor our process to be a solution for your labeling needs: from setting up satellite fulfillment centers close to your premises for same day/next day delivery, contract pricing to help you reach budget requirements, custom label size converting and more.

    Products: 

    Thermal Transfer Labels

    We manufacture thermal transfer labels for all kinds of printers including Zebra, Epson, Sato, Datamax and many other printers in over 100 sizes. Our thermal transfer labels come on both rolls and fanfold. We have Removable, Polyester and other specialty materials for different types of barcode labeling applications. Everything in stock with same day shipping from multiple locations.

    Direct Thermal labels

    We manufacture direct thermal labels for all kinds of printers including Zebra, Epson, Sato, Datamax and many other printers in over 100 sizes. Our direct thermal labels come on both rolls with 3”, 1” cores and fanfold. Everything in stock with same day shipping from multiple locations. Direct thermal labels do not require a ribbon.

    Custom Thermal Labels

    We are a manufacturer of custom size blank roll and fanfold labels for both transfer and direct thermal printing. Our production capabilities include both short run and long run production in the following thermal printable paper and films and adhesives:- white matte thermal transfer paper with permanent adhesive- white matte direct thermal paper with permanent adhesive- white matte thermal transfer paper with removable adhesive- white matte direct thermal paper with removable adhesive- glossy white thermal transfer paper with permanent adhesive- aggressive adhesive white thermal transfer paper with permanent adhesiveCustom thermal labels in materials including all temperature, freezer, colors, weatherproof materials and more:polyester , polypropylene, Kimdura, silver poly gloss and matte. Non -adhesive, Tyvek and paper tag stock.In 1"" and 3"" core sizes with 8"" O.D., 5"" O.D. or 4"" O.D. and fanfolded. For Fanfolded labels we can make pinfeed holes, and apply varnish or a laminate if needed.
    Supplier Categories: 
    Labels
    We manufacture and sell thermal transfer labels and direct thermal labels both in rolls and fanfold in over 150 sizes and stock them in 4 warehouses nationwide.
  3. Accu-Seal Corporation
    Accu-Seal is a leader in new design, and manufacturing heat sealing machinery for sealing flexible pouches.

    Accu-Seal celebrates 40 years as a leader in new design, and manufacturing of a complete line of Heat Sealing Machinery for sealing flexible pouches. Thermal Impulse Heat Sealers, Vacuum Sealers, Vacuum Sealers with Gas purge, Constant Heat Hot Bar Sealers, Tube Sealers and Feed-Through Sealers support packaging needs across all industries. Accu-Seal's Validatable Medical pouch Heat Sealers and Vacuum Sealers are built to detailed documented specifications to assure superior process protection, and Repeatable, Reliable performance across all Sealing parameters, 100% validatable. All Accu-Seal products are Made in the U.S.A using the highest quality components and supported by a Two-Year Warranty.

    Building Machines and Customers for Life is Our Promise. Customer Care, Product Quality, Service & Technical Support - Before, During and After your purchase. Call Today and experience the Accu-Seal difference.

    Supplier Categories: 
    Heat Sealers
    We are a leader in new design, and manufacturing heat sealing machinery for sealing flexible pouches.
  4. Ludlows borrows food packaging concept for single-serve gelatin shots: Gallery

    Ludlows Cocktail Co. is out to re-invent the Jell-O shot, that food-alcohol hybrid that many drinkers leave behind when they graduate from college. The company’s silver bullet is Ludlows Jelly Shots, a sophisticated, artisanal product line with a packaging design to match.

    The upscale gelatin shots are packaged in single-serve rigid containers. These 50-ml polypropylene cups are packed vertically into six-sided cartons. Each carton holds a stack of five cups sealed with rotogravure-printed foil lids; two vertical die-cut windows (open, without film) on the carton offer a good view of the product. The cups can also be sold individually, as the lids are printed with all necessary legal copy for individual sale in a counter display.

    The ready-to-serve, 30-proof gelatin shots, which are made with natural ingredients and premium spirits, come in five classic-cocktail flavors: Fresh Lime Margarita, Meyer Lemon Drop, Old Fashioned, Planter’s Punch and Moscow Mule.

    To differentiate the Ludlows Jelly Shots brand from brightly colored conventional gelatin shots—without making the brand seem too serious—the company uses light, upbeat, fun colors on its cartons and foil lids. In addition, the selective use of black dresses up the cartons. The color contrast adds visual interest, and the glossy black provides a premium touch.

    Woodcut-style illustrations on the cartons depict the relevant inspirational cocktail served in an appropriately shaped glass; an anecdote about the cocktail appears below the image. The cartons are offset printed in six colors and topped with an acrylic coating.

    • Ludlows differentiates with bright, upbeat, fun colors on its cartons and foil lids.
    • Colorful lids contain all necessary legal copy for individual sale.
    • The hexagonal carton has two vertical die-cuts (front and back displays are the same - shown in the middle carton), with fun and interesting copy on the two sides (shown left and right).
    • The point-of-purchase display talks to the brand's target customer: Female Millennials and moms.
    • Ludlows differentiates with bright, upbeat, fun colors on its cartons and foil lids.
    • Colorful lids contain all necessary legal copy for individual sale.
    • The hexagonal carton has two vertical die-cuts (front and back displays are the same - shown in the middle carton), with fun and interesting copy on the two sides (shown left and right).
    • The point-of-purchase display talks to the brand's target customer: Female Millennials and moms.
  5. Mondelēz partners with Battelle on new packaging reclosure: Gallery

    In a successful case of open innovation, snack food giant Mondelēz Intl. has partnered with Battelle, the world’s largest nonprofit research and development organization, to develop new packaging reclosure as an economical replacement to zippers and other reseal technologies. Called Low Tack Adhesive (LTA), the product only sticks to itself when simply pressed together but with high enough bond strength to provide a secure yet easy-open reclose feature.

    Developed for snack food packaging, LTA has far-reaching applications for dry goods—cereal, for example. Consumers have been asking for easy resealing for bag-in-box cereal packaging for decades. Because LTA sticks to itself and nothing else, packages might be less messy without the product inside clogging or interfering with the reclosure feature.

    One little hitch, though, on immediately using it for foods. Low Tack Adhesive has not received food-contact regulatory clearance yet. Mondelēz and Battelle are working diligently to make that a reality. But LTA can be used now as a reclose device on non-food items as diverse as wet wipes, detergents, trash bags, makeup and other personal care products.

    According to the companies, LTA is cost effective to manufacture and apply. The adhesive is applied to a variety of packaging films using conventional printing and coating technologies. It is then ultra-violet (UV) cured. Films with LTA applied can be run on existing packaging machines with little to no modifications and at existing line speeds.

    Stu Stein, director of open innovation at Mondelēz Intl., and Cindy Conner, senior market manager in Consumer, Industrial & Medical Products at Battelle, give specific details in a Packaging Digest exclusive.

    Keyword: 
    • Low Tack Adhesive reclosure sticks to itself but nothing else, creating an easy-open/easy-reclose packaging feature for a variety of products, including non-food items such as makeup and wet wipes.
    • Applied with conventional printing/coating technologies, LTA is cost effective to make and apply. And it doesn't slow down production on packaging lines.
    • Low Tack Adhesive reclosure sticks to itself but nothing else, creating an easy-open/easy-reclose packaging feature for a variety of products, including non-food items such as makeup and wet wipes.
    • Applied with conventional printing/coating technologies, LTA is cost effective to make and apply. And it doesn't slow down production on packaging lines.
  6. Study proves consumers have strong feelings for soft textures on packaging: Gallery

    Everyone agrees that the visual element of packaging design influences consumers. But what about the tactile component? Does a package’s texture influence consumers’ purchasing decisions?

    Results from a recent study indicate that fingertip appeal plays a surprisingly influential role in buying behavior. The study was conducted by applied neuroscientists at Brain House Institute on behalf of Derprosa-Ti, a unit of Taghleef Industries that makes Soft Touch film. This laminate is used to give boxes, bags and other packaging components a velvety texture.

    The study showed that products covered with Soft Touch film are 70% more likely to be chosen by potential consumers, because the film evokes 275% more emotional intensity and 247% more positive emotions than plain packaging.

    • More than two thirds (70%) of survey respondents are more likely to buy a product if it is covered in soft-touch material.
    • Among the two categories of consumer product goods tested, fragrances with soft-touch packaging make a clear impact with consumers. Beverages, too, see a sales improvement but not as pronounced.
    • More than two thirds (70%) of survey respondents are more likely to buy a product if it is covered in soft-touch material.
    • Among the two categories of consumer product goods tested, fragrances with soft-touch packaging make a clear impact with consumers. Beverages, too, see a sales improvement but not as pronounced.
  7. A flurry of container and material patents Slideshow Gallery

    The first part of 2015 has proven a boom time for the publication of patents for packaging. Perhaps that’s much like the rest of the year. In any event, we present in alpha order by vendor, an innovative mix of patent-pending packaging materials and containers that may soon see the light of day in the market if they have not done so already.

    Click the red Next button above to advance the slideshow.

     

    Becton Dickinson invented an optimized tray for holding sterile prefilled containers.


    Cryovac Food Packaging’s thermoform improves the efficacy  of modified atmosphere packaging.  

     

    Machinery supplier Delkor Systems invents a retail-ready case.

     

    A new kind of highly functional, value-added blister from MWV.
     

    Scholle Packaging invents a tap for a flexible package with a dosing dispenser.

     

    Easy-tear feature for shrink film from Winpak Films Inc.

     

     

    Keyword: 
    • This tray from Becton Dickinson, France, is designed in such a way that it adapts readily to an automated loading and unloading process. The invention relies on using prefilled syringes or vials that provide doses that are accurate, safe and convenient versus nonfilled containers. The tray or tub design overcomes the challenges of prefilled doses while maximizing the quantity of containers stored in the packaging without causing damage to the primary containers even at high production speed using robotics.
    • Modified atmosphere packaging has been around for decades, but it takes ingenuity to bring something new to the MAP table. That’s exactly what Sealed Air’s Cryovac division did with this inventive ridged thermoformed plastic dome. The idea is that the ridges reduce the product-package contact area while at the same time optimizing the effect of the gas flush atmosphere that can contact more of the product surface area to maintain and preserve the product’s color and appearance.
    • What Delkor Systems’ patent refers to as a Convertible Package Assembly and Display System is a shelf or retail-ready case (RRC) in one application. It is claimed as an improved, cost-effective and environmentally friendly variation of the RRC theme. This sounds a lot like Delkor’s retail-ready Cabrio Case development that we have covered, but we could not confirm that at press time.
    • This invention from MWV brings a sliding sleeve-and-drawer style functionality to blister packaging that is also lockable and relockable for child-resistance or other security reasons, yet the packaging also remains senior friendly to use. The filing also claims that the package-to-product ratio is maximized to save materials and reduce shipping costs. Another benefit is that this novel blister packaging is scalable and can contain bulkier and larger-sized items such as laundry pods.
    • Scholle Packaging’s tap for a flexible package having a dosing dispenser is targeted at the bag-in-box market. The difference in this invention from prior designs is that it permits metered doses. The invention involves the use of a spring-loaded piston within a cylinder and upper and lower valves. It is also notable in that no air or other contaminants can enter the bag during use.
    • Ever had problems with products like meat or cheese that are so tightly shrunk with film that it is next to impossible if not unsafe to open using a sharp instrument? Me, too. This invention for “Easy Tear Packaging” from Winpak Films solves that using holes that serve as a location for an associated tear opening to be made in conjunction with a shrink film and skirt sections that extend beyond the seal areas.
    • This tray from Becton Dickinson, France, is designed in such a way that it adapts readily to an automated loading and unloading process. The invention relies on using prefilled syringes or vials that provide doses that are accurate, safe and convenient versus nonfilled containers. The tray or tub design overcomes the challenges of prefilled doses while maximizing the quantity of containers stored in the packaging without causing damage to the primary containers even at high production speed using robotics.
    • Modified atmosphere packaging has been around for decades, but it takes ingenuity to bring something new to the MAP table. That’s exactly what Sealed Air’s Cryovac division did with this inventive ridged thermoformed plastic dome. The idea is that the ridges reduce the product-package contact area while at the same time optimizing the effect of the gas flush atmosphere that can contact more of the product surface area to maintain and preserve the product’s color and appearance.
    • What Delkor Systems’ patent refers to as a Convertible Package Assembly and Display System is a shelf or retail-ready case (RRC) in one application. It is claimed as an improved, cost-effective and environmentally friendly variation of the RRC theme. This sounds a lot like Delkor’s retail-ready Cabrio Case development that we have covered, but we could not confirm that at press time.
    • This invention from MWV brings a sliding sleeve-and-drawer style functionality to blister packaging that is also lockable and relockable for child-resistance or other security reasons, yet the packaging also remains senior friendly to use. The filing also claims that the package-to-product ratio is maximized to save materials and reduce shipping costs. Another benefit is that this novel blister packaging is scalable and can contain bulkier and larger-sized items such as laundry pods.
    • Scholle Packaging’s tap for a flexible package having a dosing dispenser is targeted at the bag-in-box market. The difference in this invention from prior designs is that it permits metered doses. The invention involves the use of a spring-loaded piston within a cylinder and upper and lower valves. It is also notable in that no air or other contaminants can enter the bag during use.
    • Ever had problems with products like meat or cheese that are so tightly shrunk with film that it is next to impossible if not unsafe to open using a sharp instrument? Me, too. This invention for “Easy Tear Packaging” from Winpak Films solves that using holes that serve as a location for an associated tear opening to be made in conjunction with a shrink film and skirt sections that extend beyond the seal areas.
  8. 12 flexible packages worthy of top awards: Gallery

    When it comes to getting the sale, many of today’s flexible packages know how to start and close a deal. The evidence can be seen in the startling good looks and improved functionality—including easy-to-use closures—of the winners of the 2015 Flexible Packaging Achievement Awards from the Flexible Packaging Assn.

     

    1. Highest Achievement Award: Retail
    Cryovac Darfresh On Tray by Sealed Air Corp., Cryovac Div.

     

    2. Highest Achievement Award: Institutional
    Intervoid Sterile by Coveris (click to see a video demonstration of the package)

     

    3. Gold Award: Technical Innovation
    Dessiflex by Amcor Flexibles

     

    4. Gold Award: Printing and Shelf Impact
    Dole Fruit & Veggie Blends by Emerald Packaging Inc.

     

    5. Gold Awards: Technical Innovation; Packaging Excellence
    Exponent 2 by Rollprint Packaging Products Inc.

     

    6. Gold Awards: Sustainability; Technical Innovation
    Freshness Plus by Sealed Air Corp., Cryovac Div.

     

    7. Gold Award: Printing and Shelf Impact
    Ghirardelli 5.50-oz Milk Chocolate Sea Salt Cashew by American Packaging Corp.

     

    8. Gold Award: Packaging Excellence (and Silver Award: Sustainability)
    McCormick Skillet Sauce Mix Pourable Pouch by Bemis Co. Inc.

     

    9. Gold Award: Technical Innovation
    Medi-CRREO with Child-Guard Slider by Pactech Packaging LLC/Reynolds Presto Products

     

    10. Gold Award: Printing and Shelf Impact
    Muscat Dates by Paharpur 3P

     

    11. Gold Award: Printing and Shelf Impact
    P.F. Chang’s Mongolian Style Beef by American Packaging Corp.

     

    12. Gold Award: Packaging Excellence
    Rust-Oleum SpraySmart Marking Paint Pouch by Printpack

     

    Visit the FPA website for information about the seven flexible packages winning Silver Awards in the 2015 Flexible Packaging Achievement Awards competition.

     

    1. Silver Award: Sustainability
    SachetLite by Amcor Flexibles

     

    2. Silver Award: Technical Innovation
    FlexAsept by Liqui-Box

     

    3. Silver Awards: Sustainability; Printing and Shelf Impact
    Gourmet Express Complete Meals by Berry Plastics Corp.

     

    4. Silver Award: Technical Innovation
    Kar’s Nuts, Second Nature Wholesome Medley PrimaPak Package by Clear Lam Packaging Inc.

     

    5. Silver Award: Sustainability
    McCormick Skillet Sauce Mix Pourable Pouch by Bemis Co. Inc.

     

    6. Silver Award: Packaging Excellence
    Organic Girl Three Heart Romaine Stand-Up Pouch with Velcro Closure by Emerald Packaging Inc.

     

    7. Silver Award: Sustainability
    Potato Starch Film for Potato Bags by Emerald Packaging Inc.

    • 1. The Cryovac Darfresh On Tray freezer-ready vacuum skin packaging system reduces film use by up to 40%—and with no material scrap because a unique film cutting process uses 100% of the top lidding web. The leak-proof, easy-open package extends shelf life and gives retailers the option of vertical merchandising with full view of the product. Using Harpak-ULMA’s Mondini Trave tray-sealing technology, cycles times are about double of the previous package.
    • 2. The Coveris Intervoid Sterile leak-resistant and tamper-evident (T-E) sampling bags insure that specimens arrive safe and secure—and eliminate the risk of cross-contamination. A unique number and bar code printed on each bag provides unparalleled track-and-trace, and eliminates the need for secondary print or labels, as well as prevents any human-process error. The patented closure and tape feature shows the word “stop” as the package is opened, for clear and irreversible indication of tampering.
    • 3. Amcor’s Dessiflex sachet protects moisture-sensitive products by both irreversibly removing moisture within the package and preventing moisture from getting into the package through the seals for up to five years—even if the package is exposed to ethylene oxide (EtO) sterilization. With a moisture scavenger within the layers of the sachet, the need for a separate desiccant packet is gone.
    • 4. Digital printing on an HP Indigo press not only produced high-fidelity graphics on this Dole Fruit & Veggie Blends pouch—the 175 line screen print realized zero dot gain—but it eliminated any color variations print run to print run often seen with other traditional print processes. Short runs helped speed the launch of this line of three products and there was no waste between printing different stock-keeping units (SKUs). Additionally, the six-color expanded gamut printing used mineral oil based inks.
    • 5. Who says a sequel is rarely better than the original? Exponent 2 combines ultra-high barrier clear polyester film with a chemically-inert sealant as an economical replacement to Barex for pharmaceutical applications such as transdermal patches. Compared to Barex, the new coextruded non-crystalline film is about half as thick, costs between 20% to 40% less, takes as much as 35% less energy to produce and boosts packaging line speeds because of its improved heat-sealing characteristics.
    • 6. Freshness Plus active barrier film with gas flush “aggressively,” according to its maker, helps keep oxygen out of the package, significantly extending product shelf life. For example, in this modified-atmosphere package, preservation-free bread lasts 40+ days, reducing food waste and improving profitability. And, the extra shelf life means companies could potentially expand their distribution areas.
    • 7. With appealing visual and tactile sensory cues, the Ghirardelli 5.50-oz Milk Chocolate Sea Salt Cashew stand-up pouch entices consumers to pick it up, making the sale of the premium product that much easier. These effects were achieved with rotogravure reverse printing on the two-ply matte film with a registered gloss lacquer to the outer graphics after lamination. Laser scoring enables clean tearing for easy opening and a zipper provides reclosure for consumer convenience.
    • 8. The McCormick Skillet Sauce Mix Pourable Pouch uses a die-cut “cap,” which tears easily and cleanly, to give consumers a controlled, directional pour—without the cost or hassle of adding a fitment or spout. The intuitive opening feature is enabled by a proprietary easy-tear sealant applied to the inner layer. The line of seven sauce mix varieties stands out on the shelf with photo-quality images printed in 8-color flexo. An opaque white polyethylene layer negates the typical gray cast seen on foil packs.
    • 9. The Medi-CRREO with Child-Guard Slider—billed as the world’s first child-resistant pouch—passed the testing requirements of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act (16 CFR 1700). Consumer products, pharmaceuticals, agricultural products and household/industrial chemicals previously only packaged in rigid containers now have a flexible packaging option that provides significant source reduction. From 5 to 18 inches wide and tall, with or without a bottom gusset, the pouch is scalable to various needs.
    • 10. With a combination of matte and gloss surfaces, the rotogravure reverse printed pouch for Muscat Dates reflects the premium-ness of the products inside. Registered matte coating helps the gloss image of the dates appear three dimensional.
    • 11. Product appearance on ConAgra's P.F. Chang’s Mongolian Style Beef package mirrors the flair of presenting the artistic plate at a restaurant. The realistic high-end look was achieved with high-definition flexographic printing that provides a sharp image, with intense colors and clean text.
    • 12. Aggressive chemicals represent a new frontier for flexible packaging. The Rust-Oleum SpraySmart Marking Paint Pouch works with the SpraySmart air compressor wand for industrial applications such as painting lines on a road. Compared to the rigid, metal aerosol containers they replace, the flexible pouches are lighter; more space efficient when empty by a 10:1 ratio; don’t require hazardous waste disposal; and evacuate the paint more effectively. The clear pouch lets users see how much paint is left.
    • 1. The Cryovac Darfresh On Tray freezer-ready vacuum skin packaging system reduces film use by up to 40%—and with no material scrap because a unique film cutting process uses 100% of the top lidding web. The leak-proof, easy-open package extends shelf life and gives retailers the option of vertical merchandising with full view of the product. Using Harpak-ULMA’s Mondini Trave tray-sealing technology, cycles times are about double of the previous package.
    • 2. The Coveris Intervoid Sterile leak-resistant and tamper-evident (T-E) sampling bags insure that specimens arrive safe and secure—and eliminate the risk of cross-contamination. A unique number and bar code printed on each bag provides unparalleled track-and-trace, and eliminates the need for secondary print or labels, as well as prevents any human-process error. The patented closure and tape feature shows the word “stop” as the package is opened, for clear and irreversible indication of tampering.
    • 3. Amcor’s Dessiflex sachet protects moisture-sensitive products by both irreversibly removing moisture within the package and preventing moisture from getting into the package through the seals for up to five years—even if the package is exposed to ethylene oxide (EtO) sterilization. With a moisture scavenger within the layers of the sachet, the need for a separate desiccant packet is gone.
    • 4. Digital printing on an HP Indigo press not only produced high-fidelity graphics on this Dole Fruit & Veggie Blends pouch—the 175 line screen print realized zero dot gain—but it eliminated any color variations print run to print run often seen with other traditional print processes. Short runs helped speed the launch of this line of three products and there was no waste between printing different stock-keeping units (SKUs). Additionally, the six-color expanded gamut printing used mineral oil based inks.
    • 5. Who says a sequel is rarely better than the original? Exponent 2 combines ultra-high barrier clear polyester film with a chemically-inert sealant as an economical replacement to Barex for pharmaceutical applications such as transdermal patches. Compared to Barex, the new coextruded non-crystalline film is about half as thick, costs between 20% to 40% less, takes as much as 35% less energy to produce and boosts packaging line speeds because of its improved heat-sealing characteristics.
    • 6. Freshness Plus active barrier film with gas flush “aggressively,” according to its maker, helps keep oxygen out of the package, significantly extending product shelf life. For example, in this modified-atmosphere package, preservation-free bread lasts 40+ days, reducing food waste and improving profitability. And, the extra shelf life means companies could potentially expand their distribution areas.
    • 7. With appealing visual and tactile sensory cues, the Ghirardelli 5.50-oz Milk Chocolate Sea Salt Cashew stand-up pouch entices consumers to pick it up, making the sale of the premium product that much easier. These effects were achieved with rotogravure reverse printing on the two-ply matte film with a registered gloss lacquer to the outer graphics after lamination. Laser scoring enables clean tearing for easy opening and a zipper provides reclosure for consumer convenience.
    • 8. The McCormick Skillet Sauce Mix Pourable Pouch uses a die-cut “cap,” which tears easily and cleanly, to give consumers a controlled, directional pour—without the cost or hassle of adding a fitment or spout. The intuitive opening feature is enabled by a proprietary easy-tear sealant applied to the inner layer. The line of seven sauce mix varieties stands out on the shelf with photo-quality images printed in 8-color flexo. An opaque white polyethylene layer negates the typical gray cast seen on foil packs.
    • 9. The Medi-CRREO with Child-Guard Slider—billed as the world’s first child-resistant pouch—passed the testing requirements of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act (16 CFR 1700). Consumer products, pharmaceuticals, agricultural products and household/industrial chemicals previously only packaged in rigid containers now have a flexible packaging option that provides significant source reduction. From 5 to 18 inches wide and tall, with or without a bottom gusset, the pouch is scalable to various needs.
    • 10. With a combination of matte and gloss surfaces, the rotogravure reverse printed pouch for Muscat Dates reflects the premium-ness of the products inside. Registered matte coating helps the gloss image of the dates appear three dimensional.
    • 11. Product appearance on ConAgra's P.F. Chang’s Mongolian Style Beef package mirrors the flair of presenting the artistic plate at a restaurant. The realistic high-end look was achieved with high-definition flexographic printing that provides a sharp image, with intense colors and clean text.
    • 12. Aggressive chemicals represent a new frontier for flexible packaging. The Rust-Oleum SpraySmart Marking Paint Pouch works with the SpraySmart air compressor wand for industrial applications such as painting lines on a road. Compared to the rigid, metal aerosol containers they replace, the flexible pouches are lighter; more space efficient when empty by a 10:1 ratio; don’t require hazardous waste disposal; and evacuate the paint more effectively. The clear pouch lets users see how much paint is left.
  9. Brand owners file packaging patents Slideshow Gallery

    See what packaging patents these 5 brand owners have had published recently.

     

    Click the red Next button above to advance the slideshow.

     

    Wm. Bolthouse Farms, Inc., Bakersfield, CA, has invented a container aimed at on-the-go consumption of foods that can be fortified with proteins, vitamins, fiber or other healthy components. The filing claims that mixing the components within a sealed pack also prevents any external microbial contamination during the process. You can view the full patent here.

     

    This patent filing from Kraft Foods R&D, Deerfield, IL, for a resealable package relies on a cold-seal adhesive.

     

    A patent from L’Oreal, Paris, France, uses a deformable membrane for dispensing oxygen-sensitive products. You can view the full patent here.

     

    P&G’s foamed bio-film patent saves material


    What can a brand owner do with multiple lines of complimentary products that wants consumers to understand those connections quickly, visually and at the point-of-purchase? A patent published by SC Johnson January 29 offers a holistic approach to do just that.

     

    Keyword: 
    • Wm. Bolthouse Farms, Inc., Bakersfield, CA, inventive container permits point-of-use mixing of separate, compartmentalized ingredients without rupturing the main container seal. The food package can be a cup and can include an exterior sealing enclosure, an interior barrier, the interior barrier separating the first compartment and the second adjacent compartment of a first and second food component. For more information, see the patent link in the article below.
    • A patent from Kraft Foods allows for a reliable reclosure for flexible packaging in a simple and cost efficient manner. One of the problems the invention addresses is to use a cold-seal adhesive in such a way that it does not interfere with consumer access to the package, e.g., by sticking to the consumer's hand. It also reduces the likelihood of food particles or other materials to interfere with the resealability of the packaging. The coating layer can also provide tamper evidence.
    • A patent from L’Oreal is for a device for packaging that preserves and dispenses an oxygen-sensitive product formulation. In noting the shortcomings of tubes, especially made of metal for such products, the filing points to the benefit of using a deformable membrane that prevents air from reaching the product. It's backed by a filler that overcomes the membrane’s memory so that it retains its new shape. Filler material options include calcium carbonate, silica and more.
    • The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, has filed a patent for a better, more sustainable way to save film and package costs other than to reduce film caliper. The key is to use a foamed film made in part or whole with renewable, recyclable and/or biodegradable materials. For more information, see the patent link in the article below.
    • What can a brand owner do with multiple lines of complimentary products that wants consumers to understand those connections quickly, visually and at the point-of-purchase? Do what SC Johnson did: Invent a way to do that using packaging design cues that coordinate related visual and textual cues across multiple, but complimentary products as an effective on-package consumer education method.  For more information, see the patent link below.
    • Wm. Bolthouse Farms, Inc., Bakersfield, CA, inventive container permits point-of-use mixing of separate, compartmentalized ingredients without rupturing the main container seal. The food package can be a cup and can include an exterior sealing enclosure, an interior barrier, the interior barrier separating the first compartment and the second adjacent compartment of a first and second food component. For more information, see the patent link in the article below.
    • A patent from Kraft Foods allows for a reliable reclosure for flexible packaging in a simple and cost efficient manner. One of the problems the invention addresses is to use a cold-seal adhesive in such a way that it does not interfere with consumer access to the package, e.g., by sticking to the consumer's hand. It also reduces the likelihood of food particles or other materials to interfere with the resealability of the packaging. The coating layer can also provide tamper evidence.
    • A patent from L’Oreal is for a device for packaging that preserves and dispenses an oxygen-sensitive product formulation. In noting the shortcomings of tubes, especially made of metal for such products, the filing points to the benefit of using a deformable membrane that prevents air from reaching the product. It's backed by a filler that overcomes the membrane’s memory so that it retains its new shape. Filler material options include calcium carbonate, silica and more.
    • The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, has filed a patent for a better, more sustainable way to save film and package costs other than to reduce film caliper. The key is to use a foamed film made in part or whole with renewable, recyclable and/or biodegradable materials. For more information, see the patent link in the article below.
    • What can a brand owner do with multiple lines of complimentary products that wants consumers to understand those connections quickly, visually and at the point-of-purchase? Do what SC Johnson did: Invent a way to do that using packaging design cues that coordinate related visual and textual cues across multiple, but complimentary products as an effective on-package consumer education method.  For more information, see the patent link below.
  10. Consumers say where packaging is falling short and rising above: Gallery

    What is the approval rating of packaging these days? Much better than the President’s. Nearly 83% of global consumers say they are at least moderately satisfied with packaging.

    The holy grail is to capture the one in 10 who say they are completely satisfied with packaging. Why?  Because they are more likely than their less satisfied peers to purchase and use products frequently (57% versus 47%), shop more frequently (24% versus 17%) and try new products (44% versus 36%).

    How can you move consumers into the completely satisfied category? Consumers say they want packages that are innovative as they relate specifically to functionality and safety.

    These and other results from the third annual Packaging Matters research from MeadWestvaco Corp. (MWV) show key gaps between how important packaging is to consumers—relative to 21 specific attributes—and how satisfied consumers are. The study measures packaging importance and satisfaction across 11 different markets: Medicine; Fragrance; Beauty Products; Personal Care; Dry Foods; Refrigerated Foods; Frozen Foods; To-Go or Carry-Out Meals or Beverages; Non-Alcoholic Beverages; Alcoholic Beverages; and Household Cleaners.

    These gaps between “importance” and “satisfaction” indicate areas of opportunity for brand owners. Improve your packaging here and sales will most probably improve.

    Keyword: 
    • Whoops...
    • Negative satisfaction gaps mean that current satisfaction is lower than the importance consumers are placing on an attribute. These gaps are where brands have the most room to improve.
    • Whoops...
    • Negative satisfaction gaps mean that current satisfaction is lower than the importance consumers are placing on an attribute. These gaps are where brands have the most room to improve.